Reshma Gunasekar O Positive

Traditional Dance Form

  • I am a Classical dancer (Bharathanatyam and Kuchipudi) from Chennai. I am pursuing my Msc degree (Electronic Media) at Anna University.

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    Abu dance festival

    Category - Traditional Dance Form

    Last Date- 2017-01-15

    Posted on- 2016-06-22 09:53:40

    ABU, the Asia pacific Broadcasting Union is a non-profit, non-government, professional association, of broadcasters in the Asia Pacific region, which reaches out to half the population of the world.

    The ABU was established in 1964 to assist the development of broadcasting in the region. Thus the ABU promotes the collective interests of television and radio broadcasters and encourages regional and international co-operation between broadcasters.

    The ABU, which celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2014, currently has 281 member broadcasters large and small in 69 countries spread across the region and beyond, from Turkey in the west to Samoa in the east, and from Russia in the north to New Zealand in the south. India is a member country and is represented in ABU by Prasar Bharati that reflects the All India Radio and Doordarshan.

    Through its various showcases, competitions and Festivals, ABU has launched several international performance careers. Its ABU Song Festival has been particularly successful. ABU now looks at starting a similar project for Dance. Prasar Bharati, representing All India Radio and Doordarshan, has been entrusted with creating this Festival.

     

    The ABU Dance Festival has two stages- the country level stage and the International stage. However, In India we are doing the Country level short listing in two stages.

    The first is the stage of DVD/ Upload shortlist. The jury will select those who go to the next level.

    The second stage will be when we invite you to record in the Doordarshan studios. From this recording, that will also be telecast nationally, the jury will select who will represent India for both categories- Traditional and Contemporary.

     

    To participate in it, we invite you to submit DVDs of your performance in traditional or contemporary dance, for short listing.
    Here are the link of Participation Form for Download : http://aidf.prasarbharati.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Participation-Form.pdf (Download it and send filled form along with two copy of DVDs/PenDrive to us)
    The address you need to send it to is:

    Section Officer, DD Bharati
    Room No.915, 9th Floor
    Tower-B, Doordarshan Bhawan
    Coppernicus Marg, Mandi House
    New Delhi-110001

    Alternatively, you can register and submit your work online at :
    http://aidf.prasarbharati.org/register/

    News


    Indian dance styles

    Date- 2016-06-20 09:38:36

    Eight Forms of Famous Indian Classical Dance

    India has a very rich culture of dance and music, Traditional, classical, folk and Tribal dances style. These Incredible traditional dances of India originated during the ancient times and are considered the mother art of classical dances. The Classical Dances of India includes Bharatanatyam, the oldest form of the classical dance in the country and one of the Most Popular Classical Dance in India and ancient in Natya Shastra.



    Bharatanatyam – Tamil Nadu
    Bharata Natyam is considered to the oldest form of dance and mother of all other style of classical dance in India. The classical Indian dance Bharatanatyam originated from the art of temple dancers in the South India state of Tamil Nadu. Bharatanatyam is reworked form of dance from the traditional sadir and combination of expression,music,beat and dance. Bharatanatyam or the fire dance is one of the most popular styles of dance performed by male and female dancers.

    Kathak – Uttar Pradesh
    Kathak is originated from Uttar Pradesh and one of the eight forms of ancient classical dances of India. Famous Kathak dance is derived from Katha or story-tellers,people who narrate stories during the whole art of Kathak dance.

     

    Kathakali – Kerala
    Kathakali is one of the most attracting classical Indian dance-drama performed by well trained artist. Kathakali is originated in God’s own country Kerala in 17th century and got popular at every corner of India. The attractive make-up,detailed gestures and elaborate costumes of the characters along with body movements with playback music are best experience to watch.

     

    Kuchipudi – Andhra Pradesh
    The Classical Indian dance form originated Andhra Pradesh state and got its name from Kuchipudi village near the Bay of Bengal. Kuchipudi is the most popular traditional dance form in South India performed with violin, flute and the tambura instruments and the characters first introduces them self by the dharavu.

     

     

    Manipuri – Manipur
    Manipuri dance form is one of the major classical dance forms of India,originates from the north-eastern state Manipur. Manipuri themes is based to the Raslila act of Radha and Krishna and is purely religious along with spiritual experience.

    Odissi – Orissa
    Odissi is the oldest surviving dance form in India,originates from state of Orissa. The Odissi dance form is known for its style, the independent movement of head, chest and pelvis. Beautiful Odissi Dance is traditional and ancient style of dance performed in the temples.

     

    Sattriya – Assam
    The Sattriya Dance of Assam is living tradition of state and one of the eight major classical Indian dance traditions. Sattriya classical dance form is well appreciated and practiced outside the state as well as outside of Indian mainland.

     

    Mohiniyattam – Kerala
    Mohiniyattam is another classical dance style from Kerala state and one of the eight principal Indian classical dance. The Mohiniyattam is a popular dance form with a drama in dance,performed with subtle gestures and footwork.

     

     

    Gaudiya Nritya of West Bengal

    The Gaudiya Nritya is a classical Bengali Dance form ,performed with drama, history, poetry, color and music. Its a ancient classical dance form originated in West Bengal,Its mainly a temple art meant for spiritual expression.

     

     

     

     

     

    Indian dance styles

    Date- 2016-06-20 09:37:46

    Eight Forms of Famous Indian Classical Dance

    India has a very rich culture of dance and music, Traditional, classical, folk and Tribal dances style. These Incredible traditional dances of India originated during the ancient times and are considered the mother art of classical dances. The Classical Dances of India includes Bharatanatyam, the oldest form of the classical dance in the country and one of the Most Popular Classical Dance in India and ancient in Natya Shastra.



    Bharatanatyam – Tamil Nadu
    Bharata Natyam is considered to the oldest form of dance and mother of all other style of classical dance in India. The classical Indian dance Bharatanatyam originated from the art of temple dancers in the South India state of Tamil Nadu. Bharatanatyam is reworked form of dance from the traditional sadir and combination of expression,music,beat and dance. Bharatanatyam or the fire dance is one of the most popular styles of dance performed by male and female dancers.

    Kathak – Uttar Pradesh
    Kathak is originated from Uttar Pradesh and one of the eight forms of ancient classical dances of India. Famous Kathak dance is derived from Katha or story-tellers,people who narrate stories during the whole art of Kathak dance.

     

    Kathakali – Kerala
    Kathakali is one of the most attracting classical Indian dance-drama performed by well trained artist. Kathakali is originated in God’s own country Kerala in 17th century and got popular at every corner of India. The attractive make-up,detailed gestures and elaborate costumes of the characters along with body movements with playback music are best experience to watch.

     

    Kuchipudi – Andhra Pradesh
    The Classical Indian dance form originated Andhra Pradesh state and got its name from Kuchipudi village near the Bay of Bengal. Kuchipudi is the most popular traditional dance form in South India performed with violin, flute and the tambura instruments and the characters first introduces them self by the dharavu.

     

     

    Manipuri – Manipur
    Manipuri dance form is one of the major classical dance forms of India,originates from the north-eastern state Manipur. Manipuri themes is based to the Raslila act of Radha and Krishna and is purely religious along with spiritual experience.

    Odissi – Orissa
    Odissi is the oldest surviving dance form in India,originates from state of Orissa. The Odissi dance form is known for its style, the independent movement of head, chest and pelvis. Beautiful Odissi Dance is traditional and ancient style of dance performed in the temples.

     

    Sattriya – Assam
    The Sattriya Dance of Assam is living tradition of state and one of the eight major classical Indian dance traditions. Sattriya classical dance form is well appreciated and practiced outside the state as well as outside of Indian mainland.

     

    Mohiniyattam – Kerala
    Mohiniyattam is another classical dance style from Kerala state and one of the eight principal Indian classical dance. The Mohiniyattam is a popular dance form with a drama in dance,performed with subtle gestures and footwork.

     

     

    Gaudiya Nritya of West Bengal

    The Gaudiya Nritya is a classical Bengali Dance form ,performed with drama, history, poetry, color and music. Its a ancient classical dance form originated in West Bengal,Its mainly a temple art meant for spiritual expression.

     

     

     

     

     

    Blog


    Street photography - how to go about it?

    Date- 2016-06-20 10:08:20

    7 Secrets Every Aspiring Street Photographer Should Know

    Street photography ain’t easy. It’s a fast moving world out there and it takes a lot of practice to be able to capture it well.

     

    However, it’s not just about practice. Every seasoned street photographer has a bag of tricks to make their lives easier when out on the streets. Below are few of my “secrets,” which I do not think are written about enough. They are not just technical tricks, but tips to help you seek out great content for your photos, so that they are interesting and powerful.



    1. Stop Moving
    Do you treat your street photography as if you are taking a beautiful stroll through the city? There is nothing wrong with this of course, but it is very hard to walk, pay full attention and still capture quality street photos at the same time. You will often find yourself out of position when a moment happens and it is much easier to be noticed when you try to get yourself into position. Finally, people are usually moving in the opposite direction of you and so it can be tough to stop your motion enough to achieve a sharp shot while framing correctly at the same time. All of this takes a lot of coordination to pull off while moving.

    The key is to slow down. Make a point to stop every few blocks and wait for a few minutes. See what happens. You want the subjects to come to you and not the other way around. Explore your surroundings in a detailed way and wait for things to unfold around you. You will be surprised at the amount of moments that will occur while you are just standing around.



    2. Pay Attention to the Eyes
    If you want to improve your street photography (or portraiture) by a thousand percent then paying attention to a person’s eyes is the way to do it. People can be so skilled at hiding their emotions on their faces but their eyes will never lie. I see too many street photos with blank stares these days. Search for that hint of emotion in a person’s eyes and it will have a transformative effect on your photography.

    In addition, direct eye contact can be extremely important. It creates a powerful connection with the subject. I usually try to avoid being noticed and so I often don’t aim for eye contact but sometimes waiting for a person to look at you is exactly what a photo needs. The photograph will still be candid as long as you capture the subject in the moment that they first look at you and before they are able to react.



    3. Focus on Details
    Street photography is not only about capturing crazy juxtapositions or fitting as many different people or objects into an elaborate frame. In fact, this is something that I see way too much. Often, it’s best to simplify your photos and search for the ‘little things’ – the tiny hints about life that everyone else seems to miss. Look at the details: a person’s hands, an expression, a piece of clothing, or a single object framed very close. Powerful ideas and emotions can be portrayed through the simplest of scenes.



    4. Shoot at ISO 1600
    Digital cameras these days are amazingly good at high ISOs. If you are in bright sunlight or shooting still objects then you don’t need to shoot around ISO 1600, but for the rest of the time it is a good idea. I pretty much live in ISO 1600, 800 and 3200. Shooting with a high ISO will help you achieve sharper images by letting you to use a faster shutter speed and a smaller aperture, allowing for more of the scene to be sharp. As long as you are using a decent digital camera, you will quickly notice that shooting with a high ISO will create a much higher quality image, despite the extra grain.

    Also, grain is beautiful! Just make sure to not brighten the exposure too much in post-production with a high ISO photo. That will ruin the photo. If you are shooting with a high ISO, exposing correctly is extremely important.



    5. Find shots without people
    Street photography is often wrongly associated with being entirely about photographing people on the streets. Street photography is about people, or more specifically about human nature, but people don’t need to be present in the scene. There are an infinite amount of opportunities out there for epic street photos without people. You just have to look for them.

    But let’s not confuse a street photograph without people with an urban landscape. An urban landscape is a straight shot of an urban environment, such as a simple shot of the Empire State Building. Street photos on the other hand say something about human nature. They have a message to them. Take the example of Layers of the City. This photograph represents the changing nature of Manhattan and particularly the neighborhood of the East Village, which is currently the fastest gentrifying neighborhood in the city. It portrays the progression from the seedy underbelly of the neighborhood to a sleek and sterile future. The shot says something about human nature and the nature of cities. It is not just a straight shot of a

     

    construction site.

     

     



    6. Shoot at Night with Artificial Light
    Night is one of the most fun and rewarding times to shoot on the street. In general, I find street photos at night to be more moody and powerful than their counterparts taken during the day. And you don’t need to use a flash (although I do enjoy the flash look). I prefer to shoot without a flash because I love the colored and authentic look of artificial light sources and I want to take advantage of the beautiful qualities of these lights.

    The trick to shooting street photography at night without a flash is to find bright areas and wait there (and shoot at ISO 1600 or 3200). Use glowing storefront signs and hang out near streetlamps. It will be worth it.


    7. Like A Fine Wine
    Street photography is like wine; it ages extremely well. This idea is something that you need to pay attention to when out shooting. Think about what is going to change. Focus on current trends or things that won’t be around in 2, 3, 10 or 20 years. For example, take a look at this 2012 shot of five people reading paper on the subway. This is not my favorite image by any means but it is going to age well extremely quickly. In 3 years, capturing an image like this may be impossible when almost everyone is using e-readers or their phones. This idea makes this image much more fascinating to me.

    And this is only a small sample. The exciting thing about street photography is that for each of these seven “secrets,” there are dozens more. What other tips and tricks do you use to improve your street photography?

    Source:Digitalphotographyschool.com

     

     

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